Wit

Definitions of "Wit"

The natural ability to perceive and understand; intelligence. noun

Practical intelligence; shrewdness or resourcefulness. noun

Sound mental faculties; sanity. noun

The ability to express oneself intelligently in a playful or humorous manner, often in overturning audience expectations. noun

A person noted for this ability, especially in conversation. noun

Intelligent playfulness or humor in expression, as in speech, writing, or art. noun

A person of exceptional intelligence. noun

(at (one's) wits' end) At the limit of one's mental resources; utterly at a loss. idiom

(have/keep) To remain alert or calm, especially in a crisis. idiom

To be or become aware of; learn. intransitive verb

The word "Wit" in example sentences

I coulda took her wit dat, wit’ just my little finger even, and broke her in two. Scene IV. The Hairy Ape

And by ‘virtues intellectual’ are always understood such abilities of the mind as men praise, value, and desire should be in themselves, and go commonly under the name of a ‘good wit, ’ though the same word ‘wit’ be used also to distinguish one certain ability from the rest. Chapter VIII. Of the Virtues Commonly Called Intellectual, and Their Contrary Defects

Some with _singular wit_, when he makes them suppose that the thing that they say or do is best; and therefore they will have no counsel of another who is better and abler than they; and this is a foul stinking pride; for such man would set his wit before all other. The Form of Perfect Living and Other Prose Treatises

Because his women of wit and humor are not introduced for the sole purpose of saying brilliant things, and displaying the wit of the author; they are, as I will show you, real, natural women, in whom _wit_ is only a particular and occasional modification of intellect. Characteristics of Women Moral, Poetical, and Historical

II. ii.86 (166,4) [Not a man of those, but he hath the wit to lose his hair] That is, _Those who have more hair than wit_, are easily entrapped by loose women, and suffer the consequences of lewdness, one of which, in the first appearance of the disease in Europe, was the loss of hair. Notes to Shakespeare — Volume 01: Comedies

I presume you were rather surprised not to see my _consequential_ name in the papers [1] amongst the orators of our 2nd speech day, but unfortunately some wit who had formerly been at Harrow, suppressed the merits of Long [2], Farrer [3] and myself, who were always supposed to take the Lead in Harrow eloquence, and by way of a _hoax_ thought proper to insert a panegyric on those speakers who were really and truly allowed to have rather disgraced than distinguished themselves, of course for the _wit_ of the thing, the best were left out and the worst inserted, which accounts for the _Gothic omission_ of my The Works of Lord Byron: Letters and Journals. Vol. 1

II. i.9 (421,9) So Tamora --/Upon her wit doth earthly honour wait] [W: her will] I think _wit_, for which she is eminent in the drama, is right. Notes to Shakespeare, Volume III: The Tragedies

Rob '. - wyard Wright of sajd Boston marriner, A parcell of Edw: cartwright grouud in the sajd Boston wit' 'a dwelling house thereupon by the sajd Wyard newly erected, the sajd Ground bounded wit' 'the Land of Thomas Shetieild Eastward, wit* "the Land of Samuell Mayo South - ward, wit' ' Suffolk deeds

The word "wit" isn't out of place in discussing Jane Austen novels, but she's not thought of as a laugh-out-loud writer like Erskine Caldwell, Colette, Terry McMillan, L.M. Dave Astor: Serious Novelists Are Sometimes Surprisingly Funny

The word "wit" isn't out of place in discussing Jane Austen novels, but she's not thought of as a laugh-out-loud writer like Erskine Caldwell, Colette, Terry McMillan, L.M. Dave Astor: Serious Novelists Are Sometimes Surprisingly Funny

Your wit is as sharp as a pencil right out of a pencil sharpener! Does It Hurt When I Go Like This?

At first sight, there is nothing in common between that highly specialized faculty which the Anglo-Saxons of the old and the new world designate under the name of humour, and that quality with us which we call wit Mark Twain

At first sight, there is nothing in common between that highly specialized faculty which the Anglo-Saxons of the old and the new world designate under the name of humour, and that quality with us which we call wit (esprit). Mark Twain

"That's what I call wit!" exclaimed Merriwell, in appreciation. Frank Merriwell's Cruise

Sometimes a remarkable ingenuity, which we call wit, adorned his aphorisms; at other times, their liveliness consisted in the happy use of popular proverbs. The Life of Jesus

What does wit mean?

What does the word wit mean? Find synonyms, antonyms and the meaning of the word wit in our free online dictionary! Find words starting with wit and anagrams of wit.

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